AFRICAN REVOLUTION IN FRANTZ FANON: A HERMENEUTICAL INVESTIGATION

AUTHOR: EZEAKA, GODWIN CHINONSO

DEPARTMENT: PHILOSOPHY

AFFILIATION: NNAMDI AZIKIWE UNIVERSITY AWKA

Revolutionary Violence as a force for liberation was fundamental to the thought of Fanon. Fanon’s arguments have been surprisingly neglected throughout the literature about him. He argues that there has been no effective decolonization in Africa because the colonial structures have not been destroyed. What happened at independence was the Africanization of colonialism. There can be no effective decolonization and consequently no freedom so long as the colonial structures obtain. And to destroy colonialism effectively violence is indispensable. Violence destroys not only the formal structures of colonial rule, but also the alienated consciousness which colonial rule has planted in the mind of the native. Unlike the socalled dispassionate native intellectuals, he is not content with a mere description of the structure of politics or a catalogue of colonial injustices. He propounds a theory of social action and makes a passionate plea for revolutionary decolonization and the creation of a free society in which man would acquire authentic existence. His vision of the ideal society was that of a socialist populist democracy, a combination of Marx and Rousseau, in which man would be free to maintain and express his nature. Using original source material as the basis for hermeneutics, I will eventually argue that Fanon’s acceptance of revolutionary violence is logically linked to the remnants of a dualistic perspective that Fanon himself describes as being of colonial birth. The more complex justifications Fanon offers for African Revolution must be seen in the light of the goals of his programme. Ends justify means for Fanon. He believed that violent means were necessary in order to achieve certain ends/ goals. This thesis concludes that Fanon’s revolutionary humanism is the outcome of a particular and personal interpretation of his experience of the African colonial predicament, and is therefore eminently hermeneutical. Thus, the result is that Frantz Fanon can only be adequately interpreted if his arguments are critically assessed in the light of his ultimate goal: “the liberation of man from exploitation by other men.” We may criticise his vision or the means of its attainment, but we neglect the issues he raises only at our peril.

 

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2 Responses to “AFRICAN REVOLUTION IN FRANTZ FANON: A HERMENEUTICAL INVESTIGATION”

  1. Austeen manuel Says:

    Please when is d 2014/2015 postgraduate form gonna b out.keep me inform

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