PLATO’S SYSTEM OF EDUCATION AND NIGERIAN LEADERSHIP: A PRESCRIPTIVE ANALYSIS

AUTHOR: NWAONWOCHEI, UCHE MOSES

DEPARTMENT: PHILOSOPHY

AFFILIATION: NNAMDI AZIKWE UNIVERSITY, AWKA

This essay assesses the relevance of Plato’s Republic for discussions of leadership in contemporary democratic societies. Specifically, Plato’s theory of the good life of the individual in the state challenges contemporary societies and the definition of the good life as desire satisfaction; his critique of democracy raises difficult questions about the ways democracies train and choose leaders; and his account of the ideal regime illustrates the importance and difficulty of taming endemic conflicts between private interests and the public good. At the same time, Plato offers an account of leadership as benefiting the entire community that remains morally active. Plato thus cannot be easily dismissed by advocates of democratic modes of organizing leadership; on the contrary, a close reading of the Republic reveals some of the enduring challenges facing democratic societies. Such challenges are evident in Nigeria when a close examination is given to her
leadership system since independence; little identification could really be made of what good leadership is in Nigeria. For a country like Nigeria to actually experience peace, stability, peace, progress and development, good leadership is needed. One of the ways to correct the errors of the past is through quality education of the individuals who appear to be potential leaders of tomorrow. In this study therefore, emphasis will be focused on Plato’s system of education to see to what extent it could help to evaluate Nigeria’s leadership system.

TO VIEW THE FULL CONTENT OF THIS DOCUMENT, PLEASE VISIT THE UNIZIK LIBRARY WEBSITE USING THIS LINK, http://naulibrary.org/dglibrary/admin/book_directory/Thesis/10947.pdf

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