POST-APATHEID SOUTH AFRICA: EXPECTATIONS AND ILLUSIONS

AUTHOR: NNOLI, LEO

FROM: THE DIGNITY OF A FRENCH TEACHER: CELEBRATING PROF. JULIE AGBASIERE

Apartheid as a state policy was operated by the white-minority regime in South Africa from 1948 to 1990. It was terminated as a result of intense international pressure and formidable liberation struggle mounted by the Africans. Its liquidation came as a result of the constitutional reforms instituted by President Frederick De Klerk in 1990. After series of negotiations between the leading parties, multi- racial elections were conducted in 1994 in which Nelson Mandela, who was incarcerated between 1962 and 1990, emerged victorious under the platform of the African National Congress (ANC). Thus he became the first President of a Democratic South Africa. He set an exemplary leadership style, which reconciled all the racial groups put South Africa on the road map for further economic development and refused to run for a second term. His successor, Thabo Mbeki, furthered the achievements he had made in all aspects of the country’s national life, and expanded the focus of her international relations by seeking new allies with Brazil and India. Jacob Zuma emerged as the third President of Post-apartheid South Africa with enormous challenges, the most recent being the August 2012 Marikana Miners Strikes during which, about forty miners lost their lives and some others sustained different categories of injury. This paper discusses the developments in South Africa since the demise of apartheid in 1990, with emphasis on the achievements of the government, the expectations of the citizenry and their illusions.

 TO VIEW THE FULL CONTENT OF THIS DOCUMENT, PLEASE VISIT THE UNIZIK LIBRARY WEBSITE USING THIS LINK, http://naulibrary.org/dglibrary/admin/book_directory/History_International_Relations/11464.pdf

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