Posts Tagged ‘Concept’

THE CONCEPT OF FORCE IN THE PHILOSOPHY OF PLACIDE TEMPELS: A CRITIQUE

April 10, 2017

Author: Ogbo Ignatius N.E
Department: Philosophy
Affiliation: Nnamdi Azikiwe University Awka

The history of African Philosophy has been plagued with plethora of problems. Most of these problems came about as a result of the wrong impressions the western philosophers have about Africa and her philosophy. Among other things, they argued that African philosophy lacks depth, rationality, originality, coherency and that African philosophy is not true philosophy but ethnophilosophy. Amidst these problems, a Belgian Missionary, Placide Tempels who came to East Africa came up with his work “Bantu Philosophy”. In this work, he tried to show that Africa truly have their own philosophy. In an attempt to buttressing this fact he popularized the Bantu’s concept of force. He believed that this concept of force underlies the worldview not only of the Bantus but also of Africa. The problem here is that he tried to portray the Bantu concept of force as the overall belief of the whole of Africa. Again his contention anchors on a strict and narrow sense of philosophy which distances philosophy from being a collective enterprise. His position again does not in any way define Africa’s idea of being holistically. Moreover, his idea of Bantu philosophy is ethnophilosophy, a cultural display which has no solid foundation. Based on all these problems and findings we shall use the method of critical analysis to show that Placide Tempels did not approach the issue of African philosophy holistically viz-a-viz Bantu philosophy. This is absurd and not true in the African sense.

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THE CONCEPT OF SOVEREIGNTY IN JOHN AUSTIN: A PHILOSOPHICAL ANALYSIS

April 7, 2017

Author: Chukwuanih Joel Joseph
Department: Philosophy
Affiliation: Nnamdi Azikiwe University Awka

Sovereignty is the supreme, absolute, and power by which any independent state is governed. It is the attribute of the state, characterizing the possession by it of all the possible powers of independent statehood, including constitutional and legislative supremacy, which entitle its government to make and implement its own decisions in domestic affairs and in the conduct of international relations, without the prior consent or permission of an outside power. Sovereignty has assumed many different guises. It has frequently changed its content, its laws and even its functions during the modern period. Sovereignty is regarded as the self- sufficient source of political power from which all specific political powers are derived, the international independence of a state, combined with the right and power of regulating its internal affairs without foreign dictation. According to John Austin, a state is sovereign when it has a body within it which effectively commands the rest of the society and which is not effectively commanded by any outside force. The concept of sovereignty as one of the essential characteristics of nation-states have been problematic as scholars have divergent views on sovereignty based on its elements-absolutism, indivisibility, permanency, inalienable, universalibility and exclusivity. The proponents of the sovereignty argue that it helps to ensure equality and non-interference in state affairs by any external influence. The critics observed that absolutism and indivisibility always lead to tyranny and undermines international relations. Hence, the inevitable questions; should the concept of sovereignty be discarded? Where is the location of sovereignty? Can sovereignty be delegated? The above questions beg for answers. However, in this study, the method of historical and philosophical analysis is used in order to ensure thorough investigation. Therefore, some of the findings show that sovereignty as an essential element of state re-enforce and sustain equality of states as global actors through mutual cooperation in international community and legal independence, which empower them not be under any form of legal subordination within or outside their territories.

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JEREMY BENTHAM’S CONCEPT OF PUNISHMENT: A PHILOSOPHICAL ANALYSIS

April 6, 2017

Author: Agbanero Isidore
Department: Philosophy
Affiliation: Nnamdi Azikiwe University Awka

Punishment is the imposition of pain on someone for crime or misconduct. Its administration has become highly controversial in the contemporary society. Some scholars of political philosophy argue against punishment saying that it is unpleasant, often painful and restricts the autonomy of individuals. However, scholars with divergent views maintain that the administration of punishment helps to control individuals’ actions, restore order and ensure peaceful human co-existence in the society. Jeremy Bentham is one of the scholars who believe that punishment has a positive impact on the society. He argues that the proper aim of punishment is to prevent greater harm, promote happiness and prevent pain. The role of law makers and government according to Bentham is the argumentation of individuals’ happiness through the punishment of wrongs and reward for benevolence. Nevertheless, in this contemporary time, punishment has not reduced the rate of crime among some countries that adopt Bentham’s principle of punishment owing to wrong application. Hence crime increases by the day. Using the method of analysis, this thesis examines the relevance of Bentham’s concept of punishment on crime control. It also evaluates how this could be used to create a peaceful human co-existence. This work concludes that it is still possible for the act of punishment to prevent greater harm and reduce crime that plagues human society. For punishment to achieve its purpose, this research work suggests that an elaborate and clear sentencing guideline should be provided for judges to reference when determining the guilt of the accused and suitable punishment for the crime committed. It is also believed that crime and corruption will reduce in the society if all criminal offences and corrupt practices are punished regardless of who committed it.

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PERFORMING ARTS CENTRE, AWKA (TOWARDS BLENDING IGBO CULTURAL SYMBOLISM WITH CONTEMPORARY ARCHITECTURE)

April 28, 2014

AUTHOR: EZEKUTE ARINZE IFEANYI

DEPARTMENT: ARCHITECTURE

AFFILIATION: NNAMDI AZIKIWE UNIVERSITY, AWKA

Performing arts centre is a place of entertainment, where actors perform live music, dance, drama, etc. to an audience on stage. A major research consideration is on blending Igbo cultural symbolism with contemporary architecture. The research was necessitated because of the increasing absence of cultural undertone/considerations and its symbols in our national architectural designs, thereby speaking less of the people’s culture and values. This research seeks to integrate cultural symbols and forms with modern day architectural character of performing arts centres, in order to produce an indigenous performing arts centre that speaks well of Igbo race. Analysis of Igbo culture and its development forms the background for the research, and then deriving its basic symbols and their basic building forms from the ancient times. The final outcome will be obvious; a performing arts center that is indigenous and also reflects the culture of Igbo people. 

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