Posts Tagged ‘Force’

THE CONCEPT OF FORCE IN THE PHILOSOPHY OF PLACIDE TEMPELS: A CRITIQUE

April 10, 2017

Author: Ogbo Ignatius N.E
Department: Philosophy
Affiliation: Nnamdi Azikiwe University Awka

The history of African Philosophy has been plagued with plethora of problems. Most of these problems came about as a result of the wrong impressions the western philosophers have about Africa and her philosophy. Among other things, they argued that African philosophy lacks depth, rationality, originality, coherency and that African philosophy is not true philosophy but ethnophilosophy. Amidst these problems, a Belgian Missionary, Placide Tempels who came to East Africa came up with his work “Bantu Philosophy”. In this work, he tried to show that Africa truly have their own philosophy. In an attempt to buttressing this fact he popularized the Bantu’s concept of force. He believed that this concept of force underlies the worldview not only of the Bantus but also of Africa. The problem here is that he tried to portray the Bantu concept of force as the overall belief of the whole of Africa. Again his contention anchors on a strict and narrow sense of philosophy which distances philosophy from being a collective enterprise. His position again does not in any way define Africa’s idea of being holistically. Moreover, his idea of Bantu philosophy is ethnophilosophy, a cultural display which has no solid foundation. Based on all these problems and findings we shall use the method of critical analysis to show that Placide Tempels did not approach the issue of African philosophy holistically viz-a-viz Bantu philosophy. This is absurd and not true in the African sense.

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MEANING AND THEMATIC ROLES IN THE IGBO LANGUAGE

March 31, 2014

AUTHOR: CHUKWUMA O. OKEKE 

FROM UJAH- UNIZIK JOURNAL OF ARTS AND HUMANITIES VOL 13 NO. 2, 2012

PUBLISHED BY FACULTY OF ARTS

NNAMDI AZIKIWE UNIVERSITY, AWKA  

Semantics is an aspect of linguistic study that investigates the meaning of words and sentences in languages. Scholars from different disciplines like philosophy, logic, anthropology, psychology and linguistics are interested in exploring the nature of meaning. But linguistics differs from these disciplines because it investigates meaning in a systematic and objective pattern. As people’s experiences and world view change, so do the meanings they associate to word change. Therefore, meaning is a concept usually, influenced by different factors. An utterance can be interpreted in diverse ways depending on the emotional disposition of the speaker at the time of making the utterance. Because of this, the intended meaning of an utterance may be different from the meaning perceived by the receiver of the message. By adopting the thematic approach to the study of meaning, this paper x-rays the different dimension of meaning with special emphasis on the investigation of theta roles in the Igbo language. The paper argues that as part of its inherent lexical specification, a verb or a preposition requires its arguments (which are usually nouns) to be in specific thematic roles because where there is one argument, there is one theta, function; and the semantic interpretation of a particular object is the determining factor for the type of theta role the argument will be assigned.

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THE AFRICAN CONCEPT OF “VITAL FORCE” NTU; A SOLUTION TO THE MIND AND BODY PROBLEM IN WESTERN PHILOSOPHY

September 26, 2013

AUTHOR: CHINEDU VINCENT OKEKE

DEPARTMENT: PHILOSOPHY

AFFILIATION: NNAMDI AZIKIWE UNIVERSITY, AWKA

The mind-body problem is one of the perennial problems of philosophy. Many, if not all scholars have tackled this enigmatic perplexing problem from different perspectives. There is an intense debate arising from the commonplace opinion that mind and body are two distinct entities- the former being immaterial while the later, material. This is, however, a dualistic approach championed by Rene Descartes. Many other contemporary Western Philosophers have held diverse opinions, like reductive physicalism- made up of behaviorism, identity theory and functionalism, and nonreductive physicalism, that is, supervenience theory, in trying to solve the mind and body problem. These theories have however, failed to resolve this problem. The fulcrum of this research work is to attempt to disprove the idea of the mind and body being disparate entities. And also to establish that “what is”, is “force” and that all these other theories have not been able to explain the mind and body relation satisfactorily. The philosophical method of analysis shall be employed in establishing that, what is common in the African Universe (even though there is the argument that it is only restricted to the Bantu people) and also the Western universe are forces. And that the theory of forces furnishes us with a more plausible answer to the question of “what is”, that is “existence” as well as proffering a near perfect solution to this seemingly enigmatic perplexing problem of mind and body.

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VIEW THE WORLD

THIS IS A WINDOW THROUGH WHICH CHINWE SHOWCASES HER EFFORTS

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